Magic material is both a reflecting mirror and a see through window

Magic material is both a reflecting mirror and a see through window

No, it’s not a one way mirror. It’s much cooler than that. MIT scientists have invented a new invisible mirror that can show reflections like a typical mirror but also be see through like a window. The magic is in the alternating 84 ultra thin layers typical glass and tantalum oxide. It’s a mirror but when you spin it, it becomes transparent. Some light passes through, some light gets reflected.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/ZIls0kVweYo/+caseychan
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Chalk that can draw deadly weapons look fun until they kill you

Chalk that can draw deadly weapons look fun until they kill you

Screw playing Call of Duty or Halo or Titanfall or any next generation video game, I want this Chalk Warfare game where you draw your own weapons and fight your friends to become real. Your weapons are only limited by your imagination and well, your drawing skills.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/B9-Va_U3spE/+caseychan
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France Lost Thousands of Vials Containing the SARS Virus

France Lost Thousands of Vials Containing the SARS Virus

Somebody’s definitely getting fired, after over 2,300 vials containing fragments of the deadly SARS virus went missing from the Pasteur Institute in France earlier this week. Not one or two vials, mind you. Thousands of them.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/SNCQjSRtqMY/france-lost-thousands-of-vials-containing-the-sars-viru-1563797276
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Best invoicing apps for iPhone: Freshbooks, Zoho, Invoice2Go, and more!

The best invoicing apps for iPhone to help you bill clients on time and easier than ever!

Looking for the best iPhone apps for managing your invoices? Whether you’re a contractor or freelancer, one of the most important aspects of running a successful business is invoicing clients on time. Unfortunately, it’s something that sometimes is easier said than done. Traditional invoice software can be cumbersome and difficult to us. Luckily the App Store is full of awesome apps that make the process a lot less painful. But which invoicing apps are the very best?

Freshbooks

Freshbooks is a complete cloud accounting solution for billing and expenses. Not only can you cut invoices right from your iPhone, you can get paid online as well via PayPal integration. If you have expenses you need to categorize and track, Freshbooks lets you take photos of all your receipts and track them. If you need to organize clients and view how much time you spent on projects, you can use Freshbooks for that too. If you have less than three clients, Freshbooks is completely free.

If you’re self employed and need an accounting solution that isn’t too terribly complicated, Freshbooks is one of the best available.

Zoho Invoice and Time Tracker

Zoho is an invoicing and time tracking service that has a no fuss setup. Just enter a little bit of information about your business, tax rate, and client rates. Pick and invoice template and start invoicing. You can also use Zoho to track expenses and time for multiple projects at a time. One unique thing about Zoho is that it also allows you to take credit card payments, a huge plus for those that want an all-in-one solution.

If you don’t want to go through a lengthy setup process or want to process credit cards, check out Zoho.

Invoice ASAP

Invoice ASAP isn’t the prettiest invoicing app for iPhone but what it lacks in pretty it makes up for in functionality. Invoices are easy to create and you can sync your data between QuickBooks and Xero to eliminate the need to do the work in both places. You can also capture signatures right within Invoice ASAP as well as add photos and voice notes to invoices.

If you have a need to add media to invoices such as photos of voice notes, Invoice ASAP is worth a look.

Invoice2go

Invoice2go is a complete invoicing solution that ties in with many other apps such as Calendar2go, Maps2go, Receipts2go, and more. Like Zoho, setup is easy and there are lots of templates to choose from. You can add custom rates and taxes as well. One thing Invoice2go does that some invoice apps don’t is parts and labor. If you need to separate them out for tax purposes, this is something Invoice2go does well. It’s worth noting that Invoice2go has two versions, the regular version and the Plus version. If you don’t need cloud sync and plan on being the only person using Invoice2go, go with the regular paid version. If you need cloud sync and access for multiple users, the free app with subscription service is the best option.

For a complete solution with an entire ecosystem of apps available to support it, you can’t go wrong with Invoice2go.

Quickbooks Online

Quickbooks Online is the companion app for the Quickbooks Online accounting service. You can invoice clients and customers, track expenses, and view most of the data contained in your Quickbooks account. While it isn’t as full featured as the actual web version of QuickBooks Online, it still serves as an easy and intuitive way to invoice clients and customers right on the spot.

If you use QuickBooks Online to manage your business, the QuickBooks online app for iPhone is a must have.

  • Free (requires QuickBooks Online subscription) – Download Now

Your favorite invoicing apps?

If you regularly have to invoice customers or clients for products sold or services rendered, what invoicing apps for iPhone do you use regularly? Do you use any of the ones above regularly? Why or why not? Let me know in the comments!



Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/kenZ7EsYyDM/story01.htm
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Wayback Machine web archive survives destructive fire but needs help to recover

Wayback Machine web archive survives devastating fire, but needs donations to recover

If you’re one of the many people who’ve relied on the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine recently, for example when government websites were taken offline during the shut down, then the non-profit organization is now calling for your help in return. A fire broke out at its main scanning center in San Francisco yesterday, causing an estimated $600,000-worth of damage. No one was hurt and no digital data was lost, since the Wayback Machine uses multiple server centers around the world. However, it sounds like the fire destroyed some books and other materials that were in the process of being scanned. The Internet Archive is calling for assistance in two forms: cash donations and fresh scanning projects from anyone who has physical collections they want to preserve, because the group has a second scanning center and needs to keep its employees busy. Follow the source link to find out more.

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/11/07/wayback-machine-internet-archive-fire/?ncid=rss_truncated
Category: Josh Freeman   Ios 7 Release Date   GTA 5 Cheats   Washington Navy Yard   alex rodriguez  

NASA sees heavy rain around Super-Typhoon Haiyan’s eye

NASA sees heavy rain around Super-Typhoon Haiyan’s eye

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Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center


Super Typhoon Haiyan continues moving toward the Philippines, and when NASA’s TRMM satellite passed overhead, it was very close to the island of Palau and packing heavy rainfall. Haiyan is now equivalent to a Category 5 Hurricane.

The forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC accurately predicted that Typhoon Haiyan would become a powerful category five typhoon with sustained winds estimated to be over 135 knots/~155 mph.

On Nov. 6, a typhoon Warning remained in effect for Kayangel and Koror in the Republic of Palau and Ngulu in Yap State and a tropical storm warning was in effect for Yap Island in Yap State.

Super typhoon Haiyan was located just northeast of Palau when the TRMM or Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite flew above on November 6, 2013 at 1026 UTC/5:26 a.m. EST. At NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. a rainfall analysis from TRMM’s Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments was overlaid on an enhanced infrared image from TRMM’s Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS). The data revealed that rain was falling at a rate of over 100mm/~3.9 inches per hour around Haiyan’s eye.



Satellite data also showed a persistent ring of deep convection around the small eye. Haiyan’s eye appeared to be about 8 nautical miles in diameter. The TRMM satellite’s microwave data showed an intense convective core (thunderstorms building around the eye) and improved convective banding of thunderstorms in all quadrants of the super-typhoon.

At 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EDT, Super Typhoon Haiyan had maximum sustained winds near 140 knots/161 mph/259 kph. That makes Haiyan equivalent to a Category 5 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center website indicates that a Category 5 hurricane/typhoon would cause catastrophic damage: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Hiayan’s center was located near 8.1 north and 135.4 east, about 113 nautical miles/130 miles/209.3 km east-northeast of Koror, Palau. It is moving to the west at 18 knots/20.7 mph/33.4 kph and generating 43-foot/13.1-meter-high seas.

Super typhoon is expected to make landfall over the central Philippines just slightly on Nov. 8 and will slightly weaken as it tracks across the islands before emerging in the South China Sea.

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NASA sees heavy rain around Super-Typhoon Haiyan’s eye

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center


Super Typhoon Haiyan continues moving toward the Philippines, and when NASA’s TRMM satellite passed overhead, it was very close to the island of Palau and packing heavy rainfall. Haiyan is now equivalent to a Category 5 Hurricane.

The forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC accurately predicted that Typhoon Haiyan would become a powerful category five typhoon with sustained winds estimated to be over 135 knots/~155 mph.

On Nov. 6, a typhoon Warning remained in effect for Kayangel and Koror in the Republic of Palau and Ngulu in Yap State and a tropical storm warning was in effect for Yap Island in Yap State.

Super typhoon Haiyan was located just northeast of Palau when the TRMM or Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite flew above on November 6, 2013 at 1026 UTC/5:26 a.m. EST. At NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. a rainfall analysis from TRMM’s Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments was overlaid on an enhanced infrared image from TRMM’s Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS). The data revealed that rain was falling at a rate of over 100mm/~3.9 inches per hour around Haiyan’s eye.



Satellite data also showed a persistent ring of deep convection around the small eye. Haiyan’s eye appeared to be about 8 nautical miles in diameter. The TRMM satellite’s microwave data showed an intense convective core (thunderstorms building around the eye) and improved convective banding of thunderstorms in all quadrants of the super-typhoon.

At 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EDT, Super Typhoon Haiyan had maximum sustained winds near 140 knots/161 mph/259 kph. That makes Haiyan equivalent to a Category 5 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center website indicates that a Category 5 hurricane/typhoon would cause catastrophic damage: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Hiayan’s center was located near 8.1 north and 135.4 east, about 113 nautical miles/130 miles/209.3 km east-northeast of Koror, Palau. It is moving to the west at 18 knots/20.7 mph/33.4 kph and generating 43-foot/13.1-meter-high seas.

Super typhoon is expected to make landfall over the central Philippines just slightly on Nov. 8 and will slightly weaken as it tracks across the islands before emerging in the South China Sea.

###




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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/nsfc-nsh110613.php
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SDSU receives $8.5M for heart research

SDSU receives $8.5M for heart research

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Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.vanstralen@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Led by Mark Sussman, researchers are using stem cells to develop new heart treatments


The National Institutes of Health has awarded a prestigious Program Project Grant totaling more than $8.5 million over five-years to San Diego State University to better understand how the heart heals and ways stem cells can help the heart repair itself.

“Regenerative medicine using stem cells has changed the way researchers and clinicians are thinking about and trying to treat heart failure,” said Mark Sussman, Ph.D., a distinguished professor of biology at SDSU.

“We now know that the damaged heart attempts to repair itself following injury, but the ability to heal is limited by many factors. Our research program centers on understanding and clearing away these limitations to restore cardiac function and quality of life to patients suffering from the devastating effects of heart failure, which is the No. 1 cause of hospitalization for the elderly.”

As the grant’s lead principal investigator, Sussman, who is the chief research scientist of the SDSU Integrated Regenerative Research Institute, will work primarily on understanding how to modify stem cells and the heart to increase regenerative potential.

The research team will use cells that have been isolated from heart failure patients the very people who would benefit directly from advances in this critical research.

Building on the success of more than a decade of research on this topic at SDSU, the goal of the program is to develop new therapeutic strategies using stem cell-based treatment to regenerate the heart. Advancing these strategies is critical as current alternatives are costly and include painful transplant surgery for severe heart failure patients.

Stem cell research

According to Sussman, stem cell research today is as important as the first heart transplant he points out that the advancements made in stem cell research, like transplants, will change the way medicine is practiced.

In the lab’s first five-year Program Project Grant, awarded in 2006 for more than $9.5 million, they were studying how to protect cells in the heart from death in the wake of injury or disease.

“We realized that in addition to losing muscle cells in the heart, the stem cells that are responsible for repairing the damage were dying too. Loss of stem cells and their healing properties takes a bad situation and makes it worse,” Sussman said. “The heart is not only injured but now it also becomes unable to recover and that is how it progresses toward eventual failure.”

The research team realized they had to find a way toward ‘restoring myocardial healing’ which is the goal and title of the current Program Project Grant. The team has however, come a long way in understanding stem cells in the heart. Advancements in Sussman’s lab have will eventually be incorporated into clinical trials with patients who will be treated with modified stem cells similar to ongoing current studies using regular stem cells.

“The research we are doing takes current approaches to the next level and raises the bar for what will be possible using regenerative medicine to treat heart disease. We are trying to understand why people lose the ability to heal the heart as they age. It’s as if you think about aging as not a passage of time but instead, a loss of ability to heal,” Sussman said. “In our research, we are trying to tell the heart cells to do something they don’t even know they can do heal quickly and hopefully, we can figure out how to accelerate the process of healing hearts.”

Collaboration

The grant provides approximately $1.7 million each year for five years to a collaborative team of medical researchers from SDSU and University of California, San Diego.

This renewed Program Project Grant encompasses four distinct but interrelated research projects, two projects located at each institution. Project leads at SDSU include Sussman and Christopher Glembotski, Ph.D., a professor of biology and director of SDSU’s Heart Institute, and at UCSD, Joan Heller Brown, Ph.D., and Asa Gustafsson, Ph.D.

Both undergraduate and graduate students are contributing to critical parts of the project, helping in scientific discovery that will lead to new approaches for treatment of heart disease. The program represents a rare opportunity for SDSU students to gain world class research experience.

“I have been researching in Dr. Sussman’s laboratory for 6 years and have been given the ability to perform cutting-edge science and take part in the development of innovative and novel cell therapies to treat heart disease,” said Pearl Quijada, a doctoral graduate student in the Cell and Molecular Biology Program. “The techniques I have learned have contributed to my success as a graduate student, and I feel fortunate to have Dr. Sussman as a mentor and be conducting research at an institution like San Diego State University.”

###

About San Diego State University

San Diego State University is a major public research institution offering bachelor’s degrees in 89 areas, master’s degrees in 78 areas and doctorates in 21 areas. The university provides transformative experiences, both inside and outside of the classroom, for its 34,000 students. Students participate in research, international experiences, sustainability and entrepreneurship initiatives, and a broad range of student life and leadership opportunities. The university’s rich campus life features opportunities for students to participate in, and engage with, the creative and performing arts, a Division I athletics program and the vibrant cultural life of the San Diego region. For more information, visit http://www.sdsu.edu.



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SDSU receives $8.5M for heart research

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.vanstralen@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Led by Mark Sussman, researchers are using stem cells to develop new heart treatments


The National Institutes of Health has awarded a prestigious Program Project Grant totaling more than $8.5 million over five-years to San Diego State University to better understand how the heart heals and ways stem cells can help the heart repair itself.

“Regenerative medicine using stem cells has changed the way researchers and clinicians are thinking about and trying to treat heart failure,” said Mark Sussman, Ph.D., a distinguished professor of biology at SDSU.

“We now know that the damaged heart attempts to repair itself following injury, but the ability to heal is limited by many factors. Our research program centers on understanding and clearing away these limitations to restore cardiac function and quality of life to patients suffering from the devastating effects of heart failure, which is the No. 1 cause of hospitalization for the elderly.”

As the grant’s lead principal investigator, Sussman, who is the chief research scientist of the SDSU Integrated Regenerative Research Institute, will work primarily on understanding how to modify stem cells and the heart to increase regenerative potential.

The research team will use cells that have been isolated from heart failure patients the very people who would benefit directly from advances in this critical research.

Building on the success of more than a decade of research on this topic at SDSU, the goal of the program is to develop new therapeutic strategies using stem cell-based treatment to regenerate the heart. Advancing these strategies is critical as current alternatives are costly and include painful transplant surgery for severe heart failure patients.

Stem cell research

According to Sussman, stem cell research today is as important as the first heart transplant he points out that the advancements made in stem cell research, like transplants, will change the way medicine is practiced.

In the lab’s first five-year Program Project Grant, awarded in 2006 for more than $9.5 million, they were studying how to protect cells in the heart from death in the wake of injury or disease.

“We realized that in addition to losing muscle cells in the heart, the stem cells that are responsible for repairing the damage were dying too. Loss of stem cells and their healing properties takes a bad situation and makes it worse,” Sussman said. “The heart is not only injured but now it also becomes unable to recover and that is how it progresses toward eventual failure.”

The research team realized they had to find a way toward ‘restoring myocardial healing’ which is the goal and title of the current Program Project Grant. The team has however, come a long way in understanding stem cells in the heart. Advancements in Sussman’s lab have will eventually be incorporated into clinical trials with patients who will be treated with modified stem cells similar to ongoing current studies using regular stem cells.

“The research we are doing takes current approaches to the next level and raises the bar for what will be possible using regenerative medicine to treat heart disease. We are trying to understand why people lose the ability to heal the heart as they age. It’s as if you think about aging as not a passage of time but instead, a loss of ability to heal,” Sussman said. “In our research, we are trying to tell the heart cells to do something they don’t even know they can do heal quickly and hopefully, we can figure out how to accelerate the process of healing hearts.”

Collaboration

The grant provides approximately $1.7 million each year for five years to a collaborative team of medical researchers from SDSU and University of California, San Diego.

This renewed Program Project Grant encompasses four distinct but interrelated research projects, two projects located at each institution. Project leads at SDSU include Sussman and Christopher Glembotski, Ph.D., a professor of biology and director of SDSU’s Heart Institute, and at UCSD, Joan Heller Brown, Ph.D., and Asa Gustafsson, Ph.D.

Both undergraduate and graduate students are contributing to critical parts of the project, helping in scientific discovery that will lead to new approaches for treatment of heart disease. The program represents a rare opportunity for SDSU students to gain world class research experience.

“I have been researching in Dr. Sussman’s laboratory for 6 years and have been given the ability to perform cutting-edge science and take part in the development of innovative and novel cell therapies to treat heart disease,” said Pearl Quijada, a doctoral graduate student in the Cell and Molecular Biology Program. “The techniques I have learned have contributed to my success as a graduate student, and I feel fortunate to have Dr. Sussman as a mentor and be conducting research at an institution like San Diego State University.”

###

About San Diego State University

San Diego State University is a major public research institution offering bachelor’s degrees in 89 areas, master’s degrees in 78 areas and doctorates in 21 areas. The university provides transformative experiences, both inside and outside of the classroom, for its 34,000 students. Students participate in research, international experiences, sustainability and entrepreneurship initiatives, and a broad range of student life and leadership opportunities. The university’s rich campus life features opportunities for students to participate in, and engage with, the creative and performing arts, a Division I athletics program and the vibrant cultural life of the San Diego region. For more information, visit http://www.sdsu.edu.



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AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/sdsu-sr110613.php
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